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Perceptions Of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome In The Emergency Department

Sunday 13 January 2019

 

From Georgetown University Medical Center in the US:

 

Hospital bed
 

PERCEPTIONS OF CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

MEDIA CONTACT:
Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
10 January 2019
© Georgetown University Medical Center

WASHINGTON (January 10, 2019) — Findings from a novel online questionnaire of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) who rated their perceptions of care in a hospital’s emergency department suggest the majority of these patients do not receive proper care, say researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center.

The study, published in the journal Open Access Emergency Medicine, is the first investigation of the presentation of CFS in the emergency department (ED). The findings highlight a profound lack of understanding of CFS by health care workers, says the study’s senior investigator, allergist and immunologist James N. Baraniuk, MD, a professor of medicine at Georgetown who treats people with CFS.

He says two-thirds of respondents report they either would not go to an ED because they believed they wouldn’t be taken seriously, or had previous unsatisfactory experiences. Only a third of patients in the survey said they received appropriate treatment in the ED.

 

Full article…

 


 

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