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Hope For An ME/CFS Autoimmune Subset: A German Researcher Steps Forward

Tuesday 3 April 2018

 

From Simmaron Research:

 

Dr Carmen Scheibenbogen
Dr Scheibenbogen has identified what she believes
is an autoimmune subset in ME/CFS.
(Photo: © Regina Clos)
 

Hope for an ME/CFS Autoimmune Subset: A German Researcher Steps Forward

By Cort Johnson
April 1, 2018
© Copyright 2018 • Simmaron Research • Simmaron Research Inc. is a Non-Profit 501(c)(3)

German Researcher Steps Up

Carmen Scheibenbogen MD is another sign that the ME/CFS field is slowly but surely hopefully catching on. Scheibenbogen is relatively new to this field, but she’s not new to medical research. A trained oncologist and hematologist as well as a physician and Professor of Immunology in Berlin, her research resume includes over 150 publications dating back 25 years.

In short, she’s a respected and established researcher, and one from Germany to boot. (I can’t remember the last German researcher to take on ME/CFS.) Her path to ME/CFS has not been an easy one. Germany hardly acknowledges ME/CFS as a disease, and doesn’t fund ME/CFS research – if I’m reading her right, there is apparently literally no avenue to apply for ME/CFS research funding there.

Yet she’s very quickly become one of our most prolific researchers. Over the past four years her team has published no less than seven papers, has won two Ramsay Awards, and played a central role in the development of the new European Research collaboration, EUROMENE. Her biosketch lists CFS/ME, Immunodeficiency, and Cancer Immunology as her main research interests.

Scheibenbogen’s first ME/CFS publication In 2014 found ME/CFS patients mounting a feeble response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) . The reduced response to EBV reactivation could help explain the ups and downs seen, particularly during stressful situations.

In 2016, figuring that when Rituximab worked in ME/CFS it probably did so by whacking antibody producing B-cells, her group examined antibodies against a variety of receptors that affect blood flow, the autonomic nervous system, etc. They found that about 30% of ME/CFS patients in a large study (n=293) had increased levels of antibodies to adrenergic (B2) and/or muscarinic M3/M4 acetylcholine receptors (M3/M4).

That suggested that the immune systems of a significant subset of ME/CFS patients might be attacking the receptors on cells which regulate blood flow, lung functioning, muscle contractions and attention. Furthermore, the finding (a “remarkable” one they said) that the antibody levels of two receptors correlated with a host of immune factors (immunoglobulin levels, T cell activation, elevated ANA, TPO antibodies) suggested that this subset of ME/CFS patients are suffering from an autoimmune disease. Scheibenbogen has suggested that the kind of ME/CFS you have may be dependent on the kind of autoantibodies present in your system.

 

Full article…

 


 

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