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ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

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How A Study About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Was Doctored, Adding To Pain And Stigma

Saturday 25 March 2017

 

From The Conversation:

 

Ellen Wright Clayton
Dr. Ellen Wright Clayton, who has worked with those who
have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, spoke to an open
committee at the Institute of Medicine in
February 2015 about the biomedical nature of CFS.
(Photo: Susan Walsh/AP)
 

How a study about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome was doctored, adding to pain and stigma

By Steven Lubet
March 23, 2017
Copyright © 2010–2017, The Conversation Media Group Ltd

The public relies on scientists to report their findings accurately and completely, but that does not always happen. Too often, researchers announce only their most favorable outcomes, while keeping more disappointing results well out of sight.

This phenomenon, first identified by the psychologist Robert Rosenthal in 1979, is called the “file drawer problem.” Although it is widely recognized – affecting drug trials, psychology experiments and most other fields – it has seldom been documented, for obvious reasons. Suppressed results are, well, suppressed, and they are usually discovered only by chance.

It was therefore almost unprecedented when a group of patients, at the end of last year, successfully unmasked the skewed data behind an influential British study, first published in Lancet in 2011, of the devastating disease known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (sometimes called myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME/CFS).

 

Full article…

 


 

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