Society Logo
ME/CFS Australia Ltd
Please Click Here To Donate ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc
 
Facebook
 
ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

Registered Charity 698

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

Mailing address:
PO Box 28,
Hindmarsh,
South Australia 5007

Office:
Suite 506,
North Terrace House,
19 North Terrace,
Hackney, SA, 5069


Phone:
1300 128 339

Office Hours:
Wednesdays, 11am-3pm
Closed over Christmas
(reopened 1 February 2017)

ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

Disclaimer

ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc aims to keep members informed of various research projects, diets, medications, therapies, news items, etc. All communication, both verbal and written, is merely to disseminate information and not to make recommendations or directives.

Unless otherwise stated, the views expressed on this Web site are not necessarily the official views of the Society or its Committee and are not simply an endorsement of products or services.

Become a Member
PDF Application Form (PDF, 277KB)
Why become a member?

When Physical Trauma And Infection Trigger Fibromyalgia

Friday 1 May 2015

 

From ProHealth:

 

ProHealth
 

When Physical Trauma and Infection Trigger Fibromyalgia.

By Juan Jiao, MD, et al.
www.ProHealth.com
April 19, 2015

Physical Trauma and Infection as Precipitating Factors in Patients with Fibromyalgia.

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate both precipitating factors in patients with fibromyalgia and any differences in clinical presentation, symptom severity, and quality-of-life between those with and without precipitating physical trauma or infection.

DESIGN: In a retrospective cross-sectional study, the authors compared patient characteristics and fibromyalgia symptom severity and quality-of-life with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Short Form-36 Health Survey in patients seen in a fibromyalgia treatment program.

RESULTS: Of 939 patients, 27% reported precipitating factors (trauma, n = 203; infection, n = 53), with the rest having idiopathic fibromyalgia (n = 683). Patients with precipitating trauma were more likely to have worse Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire physical function than patients with idiopathic onset (P = 0.03). Compared with patients with idiopathic onset and precipitating trauma, patients with precipitating infection were more likely to have worse Short Form-36 Health Survey physical component summary (P = 0.01 and P = 0.003) but better role emotional (P = 0.04 and P = 0.005), mental health index (P = 0.02 and P = 0.007), and mental component summary (P = 0.03 and P = 0.004), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: One-fourth of this study's patients with fibromyalgia had precipitating physical trauma or infection. Patients with precipitating infection had different sociodemographic characteristics, clinical presentation, and quality-of-life from the idiopathic and trauma groups. Further studies are needed to look into the relationships between precipitating events and fibromyalgia.

Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, April 16, 2015. By Jiao, Juan MD; Vincent, Ann MD; Cha, Stephen S. MS; Luedtke, Connie A. RN; Kim, Chul H. MD; Oh, Terry H. MD. From the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (JJ, CHK, THO), Division of General Internal Medicine (AV), Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Clinic (AV, CAL, THO), and Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics (SSC), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (CHK). Dr Jiao is now with the Department of Rheumatology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.

 

The above originally appeared here.

 


Arrow right

More Fibromyalgia News

 


 

blog comments powered by Disqus
Previous Previous Page