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Brainstem involvement in Fibromyalgia

Wednesday 23 October 2013

 

From About.com's Adrienne Dellwo:

 

Brain
 

Brainstem Involvement in Fibromyalgia

By Adrienne Dellwo
October 16, 2013

New research suggests brainstem dysfunction in people with fibromyalgia, providing new clues as what may cause the condition's many symptoms and dysfunctions.

The brainstem is what connects the brain to the spinal cord. It controls the flow of information between the brain and body, and also regulates basic functions including heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and feelings of tiredness.

Researchers wanted to look at the brainstems of people with fibromyalgia because of the altered perception of pain and other stimuli that we experience.

After looking at several indicators of brainstem function in response to stimulation, they concluded that brainstems of people with fibromyalgia react abnormally to sensory input.

This research adds to the growing pool of evidence that fibromyalgia is not only a neurological condition, but that it involves changes to many areas of the brain, and therefore many different functions.

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The above originally appeared here.

 


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