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US softball coach Sally Whittaker-Kahan resigns

Sunday 18 August 2013

 

From US news outlet The Morning Call:

 

Sally Whittaker-Kahan (right) talking to player Kendel Reed
Sally Whittaker-Kahan (right) talking to player Kendel Reed
 

Northampton softball coach Sally Whittaker-Kahan resigns

August 13, 2013

Northampton won the District 11 4A softball title this spring.

But even in a championship season, there is stress for a head coach and that stress takes an extra toll on someone battling fibromyalgia.

Konkrete Kids coach Sally Whittaker-Kahan (talking to player Kendel Reed at above right) has fibromyalgia and said her condition got so bad during this past season "that there were weeks and days when I could barely function. It took a toll on me."

Saying she wanted to live a better quality of life, Whittaker-Kahan has resigned as Northampton's coach, ending a successful five-year tenure that culminated in this spring's 21-2 season.

The Northampton school board received and approved Whittaker-Kahan's resignation on Monday night.

"The bottom line is this, I resigned for health reasons," she said. "For the past five years, my quality of life has declined drastically. Coaching so many wonderful student-athletes was an honor and an experience I will never forget, but with that privilege comes many other responsibilities. ... stresses, ups and downs. I don't think people on the outside truly realize how stressful high school coaching can be.

"I want to live a better quality of life that includes more time with my husband and family, visits to out of town friends, focusing on becoming a more effective and dynamic teacher, and time for new experiences."

The soon-to-be 38-year-old Whittaker-Kahan, one of the best athletes in Parkland High School and DeSales University history, had a record of 79-37 over the past five years.

Even though Northampton graduates several talented seniors, including Penn State-bound pitcher Marly Laubach, Whittaker-Kahan said she's not leaving the cupboard bare at Northampton.

"As a matter of fact, the talent coming up is mind blowing," she said. "There's always going to be athletes and talent at Northampton. The girls who are going to be seniors in this coming year -- Brianna Dalton, Hannah Peters, Taylor Kerbacher and Leandra Sterner -- have a great future, not only in softball but academically and career-wise. These are amazing young women that will have a positive impact in our world."

Whittaker-Kahan is a career exploration teacher at Northampton Middle School and says she wants to become the best teacher she can be. She will pursue a second Masters degree.

Besides teaching her players the game of softball, Whittaker-Kahan taught her players valuable lessons about life and led the team in several non-softball activities that showed them what community service and helping others was all about.

"Softball is not going to be there for them forever, so I wanted to help the kids figure out what their passions are and stress that school is important," she said. "They need to make sure they make the correct decisions.

"Sometimes you need to stop and take a look at things outside your world because there are other people out there who need something more than you'll ever need. I wanted the kids to do community service and build relationships. It's the little things in life that make a big difference. If you don't take care of the little things, the big things don't happen. Softball is just a little part of the big picture."

 

The above originally appeared here.

 


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