Society Logo
ME/CFS Australia Ltd
Please click here to donate ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc
 
 
Facebook
 
ME/CFS SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC

Registered Charity 3104

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

Mailing address:

PO Box 322,
Modbury,
South Australia 5092

Phone:
1300 128 339

Office Hours:
Monday - Friday,
10am - 4pm
(phone)

ME/CFS South Australia Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

Disclaimer

ME/CFS South Australia Inc aims to keep members informed of various research projects, diets, medications, therapies, news items, etc. All communication, both verbal and written, is merely to disseminate information and not to make recommendations or directives.

Unless otherwise stated, the views expressed on this Web site are not necessarily the official views of the Society or its Committee and are not simply an endorsement of products or services.

Become a Member
DOCX Application Form (PDF, 156KB)
Why become a member?

Substantial cognitive impairment in Fibromyalgia linked to one factor: pain level

Tuesday 28 February 2012

 

From ProHealth:

 

European Journal of PainSubstantial cognitive impairment in fibromyalgia linked to one factor: Pain level

ProHealth.com
February 19, 2012

Article:
Cognitive impairment in fibromyalgia syndrome: The impact of cardiovascular regulation, pain, emotional disorders and medication

– Source: European Journal of Pain, March, 2012

By GA Reyes Del Paso, et al.

[Note: You may read the free full text of this article HERE. In explaining their findings the authors conclude, "Pain is an attention-demanding condition; one may suppose that central nociceptive activity detracts from cognition by requiring neural processing resources."]

Abstract:
This study investigated cognitive performance in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and its association with cardiovascular and clinical parameters.

Thirty-five patients with FMS and 29 matched healthy controls completed a neuropsychological test measuring attention and arithmetic processing.

As possible factors underlying the expected cognitive impairment, clinical pain intensity, co-morbid depression and anxiety disorders, sleep complaints, medication use, as well as blood pressure parameters were investigated.

The patients' test performance was substantially reduced, particularly in terms of:

• Lower speed of cognitive processing

• And restricted improvement of performance in the course of the task.

While the extent of depression, anxiety, fatigue and sleep complaints was unrelated to test performance, better performance was observed:

• In patients showing lower pain ratings,

• And those using opiate medication.

The data corroborate the presence of substantial cognitive impairment in FMS.

While the experience of chronic pain is crucial in mediating the deficits, co-morbid depression, anxiety, fatigue and sleep complaints play only a subordinate role.

In the control group, but not in the patients, blood pressure was inversely associated with mental performance [high BP, lower scores, and vice versa]. This finding is in line with the well known cognitive impairment in hypertension.

The lack of this association in FMS confirms previous research showing aberrances in the interaction between blood pressure and central nervous function in the affected patients.

Source: European Journal of Pain, March, 2012. Presented Feb 4, 2012 at 6th World Congress of the World Institute of Pain. PMID:22337559, by Reyes Del Paso GA, Pulgar A, Duschek S, Garrido S. Department of Psychology, University of Jaén, Jaen, Spain; University of Munich, Germany.

 

The above originally appeared here.

 


Arrow right

More Fibromyalgia News

 


 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Previous Previous Page