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ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

Registered Charity 3104

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

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ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

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NPR: Raised ME/CFS Awareness on Labor Day; Advocates Had Bones to Pick

Wednesday 14 September 2011

From ProHealth:

 

NPRNPR: Raised ME/CFS Awareness on Labor Day; Advocates Had Bones to Pick

ProHealth.com
September 5, 2011

On September 5 (Labor Day), National Public Radio’s "Morning Edition" ran some segments on ME/CFS that raised public awareness - though listeners’ comments find fault with both. You can read the script of each, plus comments, or listen online.

One 4-minute segment, “Medical Mystery of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Returns,” includes patient and physician comments on the XMRV controversy - suggesting that regardless of the outcome it did raise awareness of ME/CFS.

Another 4-minute segment, “Cracking the Conundrum of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome,” [see also: our earlier news article] includes comments by proponents of the two different schools of thought on ME/CFS. (It’s a behavioral problem; or it’s a physical illness with research demonstrating many irregularities in the brain, immune system, and energy metabolism.) As listeners commented, this discussion does not, however, note that different sets of diagnostic criteria have been used to identify study cohorts.

A companion segment that first ran in January - “Learning to Live a Full Life with Chronic Illness” – is by ME/CFS patient Toni Bernhard, author of How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers. Toni describes the debility and struggle she’s experienced, and how positive thinking did not change her illness, but did help her live with the limitations it imposes.

 

The above, with comments, originally appeared here.

 


 

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