Society Logo
ME/CFS Australia Ltd
Please click here to donate ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc
 
 
Facebook
 
ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

Registered Charity 3104

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

Mailing address:
PO Box 322,
Modbury North,
South Australia 5092

Office:
Suite 506,
North Terrace House,
19 North Terrace,
Hackney, SA, 5069


Phone:
1300 128 339

Office Hours:
Wednesdays, 11am-3pm

ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

Disclaimer

ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc aims to keep members informed of various research projects, diets, medications, therapies, news items, etc. All communication, both verbal and written, is merely to disseminate information and not to make recommendations or directives.

Unless otherwise stated, the views expressed on this Web site are not necessarily the official views of the Society or its Committee and are not simply an endorsement of products or services.

Become a Member
PDF Application Form (PDF, 242KB)
Why become a member?

Impaired cardiac function in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Wednesday 3 August 2011

From the Journal of Internal Medicine (via PubMed):

 

Journal of Internal MedicineJ Intern Med. 2011 Jul 27. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02429.x. [Epub ahead of print]

Impaired Cardiac Function in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome measured using Magnetic Resonance Cardiac Tagging.

Hollingsworth KGHodgson TMacgowan GABlamire AMNewton JL.

Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, NE4 5PL, UK Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, NE4 5PL, UK Department of Cardiology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE7 7DN and Institute of Human Genetics, Newcastle University, NE2 4HH, UK.

Abstract

Objectives: Impaired cardiac function has been confirmed in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Magnetic resonance cardiac tagging is a novel technique that assesses myocardial wall function in vivo. We hypothesized that CFS patients may have impaired development and release of myocardial torsion and strain.

Methods: Cardiac morphology and function was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac tagging methodology in 12 CFS (Fukuda) and 10 matched controls.

Results: Compared to controls the CFS group had substantially reduced LV mass (reduced by 23%), end diastolic volume (30%), stroke volume (29%), and cardiac output (25%). Residual torsion at 150% of the end-systolic time was found to be significantly higher in the CFS patients (5.3±1.6(o) ) compared to the control group (1.7±0.7(o) , p=0.0001). End diastolic volume index correlated negatively with both torsion to endocardial strain ratio (TSR) (r =-0.65, p=0.02) and the residual torsion at 150% end systolic time (r=-0.76, p=0.004), so decreased end diastolic volume is associated with raised TSR and torsion persisting longer into diastole. Reduced end diastolic volume index also correlated significantly with increased radial thickening (r=-0.65, p=0.03) and impaired diastolic function represented by the ratio of early to late ventricular filling velocity (E/A ratio, r=0.71, p=0.009) and early filling percentage (r=0.73, p=0.008).

Conclusion: CFS patients have markedly reduced cardiac mass and blood pool volumes, particularly end diastolic volume: this results in significant impairments in stroke volume and cardiac output compared to controls. The CFS group appeared to have a delay in the release of torsion.

Copyright © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

PMID: 21793948 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

The above originally appeared here.

 


 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Previous Previous Page